Cosmetic Surgery Forums

Go Back   Cosmetic Surgery Forums > Non-Surgical Cosmetic Treatments > Face > Dermal Fillers

View Poll Results: Should Nurses be allowed to inject Dermal Fillers?
Yes 18 75.00%
No 6 25.00%
Voters: 24. You must register first to vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25th February 2009, 23:04
Diane Diane is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 6
Rep Power: 0
Diane is on a distinguished road
Default Should Nurses be allowed to inject Dermal Fillers?

It seems that every hair or beauty salon I visit has a nurse who is willing to inject me with dermal fillers. While I applaud the entrepreneurship of nurses I think this sort of thing should be done in a hospital or clinic setting by a doctor specialising in cosmetic work.

Your opinions please.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 26th February 2009, 07:59
Eleanor Eleanor is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
Rep Power: 0
Eleanor is on a distinguished road
Default Nurse Injectors

Please remember that the aesthetic industry was actually set up some 15+ years ago by nurses themselves who used to inject products like Collagen. At that time doctors and dentists would never have dreamed of injecting products such as this as it would have been seen to be "below them". This was 100% a nurses industry and livlihood. However this has now all changed with every man and his dog jumping on the bandwagon and trying to earn their fortune in aesthetic medicine. Doctors and GP's on every street corner are setting up clinics and trying to take the industry away from nurses.

As a nurse I started injecting back in 1993 and was one of the only people in my Geographical area who offered this service. Nurses traditionally held clinics in salons and injected this way. I have my own clinic now, but the way it used to be years ago, before doctors got greedy, worked very well.

The way to look at it is this: whoever is doing your treatment, be it a doctor or a nurse, should be qualified to do it, but probably more importantly, experienced too. Botox "training" now is typically about a 5 hour session. After 5 hours you are deemed "competent" to inject. The same goes for dermal fillers. Who would you prefer to treat you? A nurse such as myself, who has 16 years of experience in the industry and done many 1000's of treatments, or a GP who went on a 5 hour training course last week and has done 2 treatments???????!!!!!!!!!

Any practitioner who is worth their salt shoud be happy to discuss their experience and qualifications with you. They should have certificates validating their credentials. Also, nurses shoudl be Independent Prescribers to be able to prescribe Botox, which is a prescription only medicine.

I hope this helps.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 26th February 2009, 18:29
Joanne W Joanne W is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 8
Rep Power: 0
Joanne W is on a distinguished road
Default

Agree with Eleanor and would even argue that beauticians should be able to do botox and fillers. My beautician offers chemical peeling and I'm sure she would be excellent at botox and fillers if she was allowed to do it.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 26th February 2009, 20:30
Bindhu72's Avatar
Bindhu72 Bindhu72 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 16
Rep Power: 0
Bindhu72 is on a distinguished road
Default

i think most nurses would be good at doing it but i would feel more comfortable if a dr were to do it to me. can't explain it.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 26th February 2009, 22:05
Clare M Clare M is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 11
Rep Power: 0
Clare M is on a distinguished road
Default

The issues for me are:

Should dermal fillers be given in a beauty salon? is there sufficient safety medical equipment should the client has an anaphlyactic reaction to the dermal filler?

Can the practitioner deal with any resulting cosmetic complications of the dermal filler without having to refer to a plastic surgeon?

Does the practitioner have sufficient insurance to cover any malpractice claim?

Does the practitioner have to show evidence of continuing medical education, progression and revalidation as a GP would have to?

Is the practitioner subject to audit as hospital practitioners are?

Clare
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 26th February 2009, 22:21
Pink's Avatar
Pink Pink is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 59
Rep Power: 6
Pink is on a distinguished road
Default

I would have no qualms about going to a nurse for botox and fillers as long as they are have been adequately trained and come recommended. Besides they would probably be cheaper too!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 26th February 2009, 22:28
Sarah C's Avatar
Sarah C Sarah C is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 65
Rep Power: 6
Sarah C is on a distinguished road
Default

Absolutely yes. Nurses do the bulk of the injecting on the wards anyway!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 26th February 2009, 23:16
MLB MLB is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3
Rep Power: 0
MLB is on a distinguished road
Smile Nurses should be allowed to inject dermal fillers

Dermal fillers were first injected in the UK in the form of Zyderm and Zyplast collagen. This was done by nurses and the nurses were responsible for teaching doctors and plastic surgeons to do so. I am a nurse, an independent prescriber and a medical trainer. I train the doctors, dentists and nurses to inject Botox and dermal fillers. I have worked for the big international company Q-Med who make Restylane and I still work for many other international companies who provide dermal fillers. I train doctors from all over the world and have my own practice in Harley St London and in the Midllands.
In my extensive experience, I have come across unfortunate patients who have been treated by consultant surgeons, doctors etc and who have had at best poor results from their treatments and at worst some pretty nasty results and complications. My advice to those seeking treatments is not to simply follow the doctor route to find a practitioner. Do your homework on how long your practitioner has been doing such treatments for, who trained them, where and how much experience they have. Remember that there are good and bad injectors out there and they all come in the shape of doctors, dentists and nurses. Doctors do not automatically have the skills to create your dream face just because of their title! Do not be put off by the fact that a nurse is offering treatment - a nurse may be better than some doctors! Anyone who has been properly trained should be aware of the risks that treatments carry and they should have adequate anaphalaxis treatment if visiting salons and clinics. Not to do so is negligent. Also, everyone out there, are you aware that Botox is a prescription only medication and as such must always be prescribed for you after a thorough medical consultation with a prescriber?Dermal fillers and Botox can be dangerous if injected by the inexperienced doctor, dentist or nurse. Remember,the title of the person performing the procedure does not automatically convey onto them good skills or bad ones! And finally, always read your consent form and ask lots of questions. Hope this helps!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 1st March 2009, 12:22
Sharon Bailey Sharon Bailey is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 0
Sharon Bailey is on a distinguished road
Default Nurses Injecting Dermal Fillers

In reply to the question should nurses be allowed to inject dermal fillers. Yes, absolutely. I am a nurse injector with many years experience I am the Field Clinical Specialist for a top dermal filler manufacturer and I teach extensively through out the UK and Europe. In my experience we have some extremely competent nurses out there providing an excellent service to thier clients. Moreover, a nurse will usually give a completely unbiased opinion/consultation to his/her client after all we still remain the patients advocate. I do believe that training is paramount in the application and provision of any aesthetic procedure and we do need the industry to be appropriately policed. I would encourage any person seeking a dermal filler treatment to ensure and ask to see the providers certificate of insurance and training certificates and only by doing this can we assure that the treatments are being carried out by responsible and appropriately trained practitioners be that an nurse, doctor or dentist who don't forget are accountable to their individual professional bodies.

Sharon Bailey, RN
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 1st March 2009, 12:40
jhellie_baby jhellie_baby is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 35
Rep Power: 0
jhellie_baby is on a distinguished road
Default

if the nurse is well trained i will go for it. there are various instances that its not just for more on the beautification a nurse could participate to. in hospital setting where she has experience in doing the skill. then its okay for me to be injected with a nurse.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 2nd March 2009, 13:22
Mr James McDiarmid's Avatar
Mr James McDiarmid Mr James McDiarmid is offline
Forum Surgeon
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Cornwall and Gloucestershire
Posts: 175
Rep Power: 6
Mr James McDiarmid is on a distinguished road
Default

As a plastic surgeon in full time aesthetic practice I certainly do not think that injecting botox and fillers is beneath me, although I can think of several consultant colleagues who would never and have never offered these treatments!

I have been injecting for 10 years or so and have three excellent nurses who work with me in my clinics who have been well trained and are highly competent.

Fillers do have place and so long as the injector is competent and the patient a well informed good candidate they are generally safe and effective.

I fully echo the sentiments expressed by the aesthetic nurses who posted earlier on this thread WRT less experienced individuals from diverse backgrounds trying to cash in on the expanding aesthetic market. Many see it as a growth area for their businesses and the brevity of their "training" combined with the unregulated nature of this sphere of practice is where the danger lies.

I voted yes in the poll by the way.
__________________
Mr James G M McDiarmid
MSc FRCS (Eng) FRCS (Plast)
Consultant Plastic Surgeon

www.woodestate.co.uk
www.mhclinic.co.uk
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 9th March 2009, 20:52
bubble bubble is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 56
Rep Power: 6
bubble is on a distinguished road
Default

I had to vote yes.

Provided the nurses in question had received a high level of training then there should be no problems.
__________________
www.dreamology.wordpress.com
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12th March 2009, 08:04
katieh katieh is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: cambridgeshire
Posts: 19
Rep Power: 0
katieh is on a distinguished road
Default

Absolutely yes! Nurses are the ones who administer and I've always felt more comfortable with nurses carrying out injections than doctors.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 17th March 2010, 14:18
drjon drjon is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 0
drjon is on a distinguished road
Default Should nurses be allowed to inject dermal fillers?

I think that regardless of whether the practitioner is a nurse or a doctor, you will always come across good/bad and experienced/inexperienced injectors.

With reference to one of the other replies, doctors are not necessarily better at injecting fillers 'because of their title', but they are more qualified with regard to the structure of the facial muscles, nerves, vessels, etc. I think you'll find that any doctor has done many years of training prior to learning to inject fillers. In my opinion, this helps tremendously in the filler training they may take up.

I have come across many nurses who cannot handle a needle or a patient properly and who have apparently "adequately passed a course on injectables". Simply have a certificate means absolutely nothing about your ability to inject safely and effectively.

A patient needs to carry out a lot of research prior to deciding upon a practitioner. In my opinion simply because nurses traditionally started the mass industry of injecting fillers, doesn't make them more qualified or even as qualified! You used to be able to fly a plane without a licence but that doesn't mean it's safe to do so now.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 26th March 2010, 08:52
chippy378 chippy378 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 0
chippy378 is on a distinguished road
Default

Whilst Doctors study for many years prior to their qualification it does not necessarily make them better with a needle. These days it is the nurses who do most of the injecting of patients. As a Nurse I am perfectly capable of handling a needle and injecting filler into peoples faces. We are taught to recognise the danger signs and the anatomy of the face. Most nurses I know are well adept at handling patients, myself included. I worked for a private cosmetic group for some time injecting dermal filler, botox etc and I always had my patients best interests at heart. In these clinics the patient advisor is out to make money from the client and will try to push the nurse to do more. I would only do what was right for the client and would not be pushed into something that wasn't - but I know that in some clinics lesser experienced nurses may be. I now operate individually of this clinic, using the same products but at a far more affordable price. The mark up these clinics use is enormous! So it is not always best to go to a professional clinic, but saying that I would avoid the beauty salons!!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 9th July 2010, 07:40
AndrewCopeland AndrewCopeland is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 0
AndrewCopeland is on a distinguished road
Default Dermal fillers

Agree with Eleanor.. I would feel more comfortable if a dr were to do it to me. When looking for someone to provide dermal fillers, be aware that doctors, nurses and dermatologists can administer the treatment. When looking for a professional to provide dermal fillers check they are qualified to do so - a professional should be happy to reassure you by showing their credentials.
__________________
Dermal fillers
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 17th August 2010, 10:50
winlow winlow is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1
Rep Power: 0
winlow is on a distinguished road
Question I am a RGN researching non invasive cosmetic procedures

I was intrested to read your comments and would be very interested to receiving some information about the training, venue, content etc you offer for botox and fillers. I am looking to practice myself once I can decide on the best trainer for me. I live and practice as a A&E staff nurse in the midlands. look forward to hearing from you regards pat
Quote:
Originally Posted by MLB View Post
Dermal fillers were first injected in the UK in the form of Zyderm and Zyplast collagen. This was done by nurses and the nurses were responsible for teaching doctors and plastic surgeons to do so. I am a nurse, an independent prescriber and a medical trainer. I train the doctors, dentists and nurses to inject Botox and dermal fillers. I have worked for the big international company Q-Med who make Restylane and I still work for many other international companies who provide dermal fillers. I train doctors from all over the world and have my own practice in Harley St London and in the Midllands.
In my extensive experience, I have come across unfortunate patients who have been treated by consultant surgeons, doctors etc and who have had at best poor results from their treatments and at worst some pretty nasty results and complications. My advice to those seeking treatments is not to simply follow the doctor route to find a practitioner. Do your homework on how long your practitioner has been doing such treatments for, who trained them, where and how much experience they have. Remember that there are good and bad injectors out there and they all come in the shape of doctors, dentists and nurses. Doctors do not automatically have the skills to create your dream face just because of their title! Do not be put off by the fact that a nurse is offering treatment - a nurse may be better than some doctors! Anyone who has been properly trained should be aware of the risks that treatments carry and they should have adequate anaphalaxis treatment if visiting salons and clinics. Not to do so is negligent. Also, everyone out there, are you aware that Botox is a prescription only medication and as such must always be prescribed for you after a thorough medical consultation with a prescriber?Dermal fillers and Botox can be dangerous if injected by the inexperienced doctor, dentist or nurse. Remember,the title of the person performing the procedure does not automatically convey onto them good skills or bad ones! And finally, always read your consent form and ask lots of questions. Hope this helps!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 31st August 2010, 22:38
Amydoes Amydoes is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 46
Rep Power: 0
Amydoes is on a distinguished road
Default

Why not, as long as they are highly trained and good at what they do.
__________________
Tummy Tuck | Cure for Warts
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 3rd June 2013, 19:20
cyber_gypsy cyber_gypsy is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 15
Rep Power: 0
cyber_gypsy is on a distinguished road
Default

I answered yes but this was not based on me knowing anything about dermal fillers but the fact that most nurses can do simple procedures. I assume that it is a simple procedure since it is performed in salons.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 9th September 2013, 10:08
rubymusic1 rubymusic1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: UK
Posts: 123
Rep Power: 2
rubymusic1 is on a distinguished road
Default

If they're actually qualified to do so and know what they're doing, i'm sure there's no problem with it.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 9th September 2013, 21:36
suegiplaye suegiplaye is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 4
Rep Power: 0
suegiplaye is on a distinguished road
Default

If they are taught to do it, I do not see anything wrong with them doing it. They are trained health care professionals.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 1st February 2014, 14:05
marie4u marie4u is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 15
Rep Power: 0
marie4u is on a distinguished road
Default

yes they should be allowed
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
permanent dermal fillers for the nose kimmyh51 Nose Reshaping (Rhinoplasty) 7 16th April 2013 07:58
Training courses for nurses - advice please!! TRACY10 Training 1 2nd April 2011 21:33
Dermal Fillers in Beauty Salons SAN Dermal Fillers 0 18th April 2010 11:42
Training for Nurses la ribote Training 4 21st November 2009 07:58
What type of Dermal Filler Joanne W Ask our Cosmetic Surgeons 1 25th February 2009 19:12


All times are GMT. The time now is 15:21.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) cosmeticsurgeryforums.co.uk